Gensha Tumblr
Gensha is blogging to fill people's desire with beauty, fashion, art, and architecture.
Twitter:@Suzuki0531
Gensha Tumblr
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dolcegabbana:

The #lightbluejourney continues, discover the atmosphere that inspired the Light Blue Journey – Escape to Panarea scent on www.peaceloveshea.com#dglightblue #escapetopanarea #lightbluegeneration #dolcegabbana
 
dolcegabbana:

The #lightbluejourney continues, discover the atmosphere that inspired the Light Blue Journey – Escape to Panarea scent on www.peaceloveshea.com#dglightblue #escapetopanarea #lightbluegeneration #dolcegabbana
 
dolcegabbana:

The #lightbluejourney continues, discover the atmosphere that inspired the Light Blue Journey – Escape to Panarea scent on www.peaceloveshea.com#dglightblue #escapetopanarea #lightbluegeneration #dolcegabbana
 
dolcegabbana:

The #lightbluejourney continues, discover the atmosphere that inspired the Light Blue Journey – Escape to Panarea scent on www.peaceloveshea.com#dglightblue #escapetopanarea #lightbluegeneration #dolcegabbana
 
dolcegabbana:

The #lightbluejourney continues, discover the atmosphere that inspired the Light Blue Journey – Escape to Panarea scent on www.peaceloveshea.com#dglightblue #escapetopanarea #lightbluegeneration #dolcegabbana
 
dolcegabbana:

The #lightbluejourney continues, discover the atmosphere that inspired the Light Blue Journey – Escape to Panarea scent on www.peaceloveshea.com#dglightblue #escapetopanarea #lightbluegeneration #dolcegabbana
 
dolcegabbana:

The #lightbluejourney continues, discover the atmosphere that inspired the Light Blue Journey – Escape to Panarea scent on www.peaceloveshea.com#dglightblue #escapetopanarea #lightbluegeneration #dolcegabbana
 
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blua:

from89: Light Installations by Barry Underwood
blua:

from89: Light Installations by Barry Underwood
blua:

from89: Light Installations by Barry Underwood
blua:

from89: Light Installations by Barry Underwood
blua:

from89: Light Installations by Barry Underwood
blua:

from89: Light Installations by Barry Underwood
blua:

from89: Light Installations by Barry Underwood
blua:

from89: Light Installations by Barry Underwood
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womensweardaily:

Fine Jewelry Trend: Matte Point
Courtesy Photo
There’s more to fine jewelry than diamonds and shine. A silky matte finish adds a delicate sheen to gold for a supersophisticated look. Here, Ileana Makri ring.
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tiffanyandco:

Time to shine.  
Shop pendants. 
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womensweardaily:

Fine Jewelry Trend: Matte Point
Courtesy Photo
There’s more to fine jewelry than diamonds and shine. A silky matte finish adds a delicate sheen to gold for a supersophisticated look. Here, Monique Péan ring.
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rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
rocketumbl:

SibNIA
Siberian Aeronautical Research Institute named after S. A. Chaplygin
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architizer:

Here’s what to do with Brazil’s World Cup stadia. Read more.
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ryanpanos:

Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
ryanpanos:

Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
ryanpanos:

Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
ryanpanos:

Moshav Villages of Israel | Via
Moshav is a type of agricultural community in Israeli consisting of a group of individual farms. The moshav is generally based on the principle of private ownership of land, emphasis on community labor and communal marketing. Workers produce crops and goods on their properties through individual or pooled labour and resources, and use profit and foodstuffs to provide for themselves. The farmers pay an amount of tax and this money is used to provide agricultural services to the community, like buying supplies and marketing the farm produce.
The first moshav was established in the Jezreel Valley in 1921. During the period of large-scale immigration after the creation of Israel  in 1948, the moshav was found to be an ideal settlement form for the new immigrants, almost none of whom were accustomed to communal living. By 1986 about 156,700 Israelis lived and worked on 448 moshavim.
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prostheticknowledge:

Carrara Robotics
Demonstration of a robotic controlled diamond wire cutter sawing through marble - video embedded below:

[Link]
prostheticknowledge:

Carrara Robotics
Demonstration of a robotic controlled diamond wire cutter sawing through marble - video embedded below:

[Link]
prostheticknowledge:

Carrara Robotics
Demonstration of a robotic controlled diamond wire cutter sawing through marble - video embedded below:

[Link]
prostheticknowledge:

Carrara Robotics
Demonstration of a robotic controlled diamond wire cutter sawing through marble - video embedded below:

[Link]
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humanoidhistory:

Skylab and Earth, June 22, 1973. (NASA)
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projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
projecthabu:

     The historic SR-71 simulator, on display at the incredible Frontiers of Flight museum in Dallas, Texas, was used for crew selection and training for the SR-71 Blackbird. It was designed and manufactured from 1963 to 1965 by Link Aviation Inc.
     The simulator was in use at Beale Air Force Base in Northern California until 1990, when the USAF Blackbird Program was cancelled. The Air Force transferred the simulator, along with three flying SR-71 aircraft to NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, now called Armstrong Flight Research Center, in Southern California. The sim stayed at Armstrong until 2006, and it rests here in Dallas today.
     The first photo shows the pilot cabin, where the pilot and flight instructor sat. This pilot cabin would simulate motion, and when the simulator unstarted, you felt it; though, it wasn’t as violent as an unstart could be in the actual aircraft. The Reconnaissance Systems Operator (RSO) cockpit, shown in the second photo,did not need to move. These cockpits could be used in tandem, or separately, depending on what mode was selected.
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projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
projecthabu:

     Here, we have the Saturn V rocket, housed inside the Apollo/Saturn V Center at Kennedy Space Center near Titusville, Florida, just a few miles from Launch complex 39, where these beasts once roared into the sky.
     When we look at the enormous first stage of the Saturn V rocket, called an S-IC, we think “spaceship”. Truthfully, the Saturn V first stage never actually made it into space. The stage only burned for the first 150 seconds of flight, then dropped away from the rest of the rocket, all while remaining totally inside Earth’s atmosphere. The S-IC stage is merely an aircraft.
     Even more truthfully, the S-IC stage displayed here at the Apollo/Saturn V Center at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, never flew at all. It is a static test article, fired while firmly attached to the ground, to make sure the rocket would actually hold together in flight. Obviously, these tests were successful, (e.g. she didn’t blow up), and she sits on our Apollo museum today. I wrote more about this particular stage in a previous post, (click here to view.)
     The rest of the rocket, the second and third stages, called the S-II and S-IVB stages, did fly into space. The S-II put the manned payload into orbit, and the S-IVB was responsible for initially propelling that payload from earth orbit to the moon, an act called “trans-lunar injection” (TLI).
     The particular rocket in this display, except for the first stage, is called SA-514. 514 was going to launch the cancelled Apollo 18 and 19 moon missions.
     The command/service module (CSM) in the photos is called CSM-119. This particular capsule is unique to the Apollo program, because it has five seats. All the others had three. 119 could launch with a crew of three, and land with five, because it was designed it for a possible Skylab rescue mission. It was later used it as a backup capsule for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.
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positivelynoteworthy:

Clara (via LCKP)
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tt48:

アドギャラリー | タキロン×PASSPO☆スペシャルプロジェクト
tt48:

アドギャラリー | タキロン×PASSPO☆スペシャルプロジェクト
tt48:

アドギャラリー | タキロン×PASSPO☆スペシャルプロジェクト
tt48:

アドギャラリー | タキロン×PASSPO☆スペシャルプロジェクト
tt48:

アドギャラリー | タキロン×PASSPO☆スペシャルプロジェクト
tt48:

アドギャラリー | タキロン×PASSPO☆スペシャルプロジェクト
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gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station
gasoline-station:

Iconic Houses
Design/Animation: Matteo Muci (Artist on Tumblr Here)
GIF: The Gasoline Station